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Trump for the working class..
#1
Well..


Quote:Just a few hours before he officially accepts the presidential nomination of the Republican party, Donald Trump agreed to pay a $11,200 federal settlement for retaliating against workers who voted to unionize at his eponymous Las Vegas hotel.

Trump, who claims he “never settles” when sued, agreed to pay the workers after the National Labor Relations Board found that Trump’s corporation had unfairly challenged the union vote and illegally retaliated against the workers who led the organization effort. Trump must now pay back wages to two workers, one of whom the hotel fired and another who was denied a promotion for convincing her 500-plus co-workers to join the Culinary Workers Union in Las Vegas. Under the terms of the settlement, Trump did not admit breaking federal labor laws.

Workers at the hotel also told ThinkProgress that the Trump corporation threatened and intimidated them in the lead up to the union vote.
Trump To Pay Thousands For Retaliating Against Workers On Day He Accepts The GOP Nomination | ThinkProgress
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#2
Trump for the working class, you can't make this stuff up..

Quote:Another answer is that in an era of intense partisanship, the greatest risk facing many Republican politicians isn’t that of losing in the general election, it’s that of losing to an extremist primary challenger. This makes them afraid to cross Mr. Trump, whose ugliness channels the true feelings of the party’s base.

But there’s a third answer, which can be summarized in one number: 34.

What’s that? It’s the Congressional Budget Office’s estimate of the average federal tax rate for the top 1 percent in 2013, the latest year available. And it’s up from just 28.2 in 2008, because President Obama allowed the high-end Bush tax cuts to expire and imposed new taxes to pay for a dramatic expansion of health coverage under the Affordable Care Act. Taxes on the really, really rich have gone up even more.
If Hillary Clinton wins, taxes on the elite will at minimum stay at this level, and may even go up significantly if Democrats do well enough in congressional races to enable her to pass new legislation. The nonpartisanTax Policy Center estimates that her tax plan would raise the average tax rate for the top 1 percent by another 3.4 percentage points, and the rate for the top 0.1 percent by five points.

But if “populist” Donald Trump wins, taxes on the wealthy will go way down; in particular, Mr. Trump is calling for elimination of the inheritance tax, which these days hits only a tiny number of really yuuuge estates (a married couple doesn’t pay any tax unless its estate is worth more than$10.9 million).

Getting rid of the estate tax is “the linchpin of the conservative movement,” one major donor told Bloomberg’s Sahil Kapur. Gotta get those priorities straight.
Pieces of Silver - The New York Times
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#3
Even when he proposes a sensible policy for a provision that most other advanced nations have, it turns out to be highly regressive..

Quote:At first glance, the candidate who once dismissed child care as an issue that employers could easily address with blocks and swings seems to have experienced a change of heart. After all, the cost of child care exceeds rent in every state and college tuition in most areas. It is no exaggeration to say that America is facing a child-care crisis.

Unfortunately, Trump's child-care plan doesn’t address that crisis because it would primarily benefit people like his own family and do little to help the people who need it most. Tax deductions are inherently regressive. Unlike a tax credit, which reduces the amount of taxes owed, or a “refundable” tax credit, which goes to people even if they don’t owe taxes, a tax deduction is worth more to people the higher their tax bracket.

Trump’s proposal would allow families to deduct the average cost of child care, presumably around $10,000 per child. But for a family in the lowest bracket in Trump’s tax plan—those earning below $58,000 annually—the deduction could be worthless. On the other hand, wealthier people in the top bracket—those earning $308,000 or more annually—could save $3,300 per year. In fact, families that earn less income spend a higher proportion of it on child care. They’re the ones facing a crunch paying for child care.

Among families with child-care expenses, those living in poverty spend over one-third of their income on child-care payments. For low-income families living just above the poverty level (up to $48,000 annually for a family of four), child-care costs account for 20 percent of monthly income. By comparison, the rate for higher earners is less than 10 percent.

Furthermore, most families pay child-care tuition on a weekly or monthly basis and cannot afford the out-of-pocket costs. A tax deduction wouldn’t provide relief from child-care costs until the end of the year, so Trump’s help would be too late as well as too little for them.

Critically, Trump’s plan also misses a key component of the child-care crisis: the child-care workforce. Today, the median wage for child-care workers is less than $10 per hour—less than earnings for animal caretakers, who make $11.71 per hour. The people entrusted to care for other people’s children often cannot provide for their own. That low pay shouldn’t just be a concern of theirs. The most important aspect of good child care is the interaction between the caregivers and children, and chronically low wages and poor working conditions aren’t conducive to the sustained attention and care that children need. It is not surprising, then, that just 10 percent of child-care programs today are rated as high-quality.
Trump’s Baby Step on Child Care
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#4
We don't want to invoke silly Marxist stuff about 'false consciousness' but it is nevertheless remarkable that blue collar workers can be conned by Trump:

Quote:Donald Trump, the billionaire candidate who has argued that “having a low minimum wage is not a bad thing for this country” and complained in a 2015 GOP debate that wages are “too high,” is running for president this fall on the most virulently anti-worker and anti-union platform in the history of his Republican Party

Trump and the anti-labor partisans who nominated him for the presidency have rejected the legacy of a Grand Old Party that once cheered when Abraham Lincoln declared: “Labor is prior to and independent of capital. Capital is only the fruit of labor, and could never have existed if labor had not first existed. Labor is the superior of capital, and deserves much the higher consideration.”

This year’s Republican platform is dismissive of the federal minimum wage, declaring (in a stance similar to the one Trump appears to have evolved toward) that decisions about base hourly wages “should be handled at the state and local level.” It endorses the anti-union “right-to-work” laws enacted by Republican governors such as Wisconsin’s Scott Walker, and calls for taking the anti-union crusade national with a proposal “for a national law” along “right-to-work” lines. The 2016 GOP platform also attacks the use of the Fair Labor Standard Act to protect workers; rips the use of Project Labor Agreements to raise wages and improve working conditions; and proposes to gut the 85-year-old Davis-Bacon Act, which guarantees “prevailing wage” pay for workers on federal projects. At campaign stops in swing states such as Ohio, Trump tries to portray himself as a champion of workers. 
Donald Trump Is the Anti–Labor Day Candidate: Running Against Fair Wages, Worker Rights, and Unions | The Nation

The article puts it in sharp contrast with the Republican party of the 1950s, the gap can hardly be greater.
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#5
In fact, here is Eisenhower with a reminder..

Quote:Only a handful of unreconstructed reactionaries harbor the ugly thought of breaking unions,” Eisenhower argued in the prosperous 1950s. “Only a fool would try to deprive working men and women of the right to join the union of their choice.”
Donald Trump Is the Anti–Labor Day Candidate: Running Against Fair Wages, Worker Rights, and Unions | The Nation
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#6
So how is Trump going to create jobs? Well, here he is, in his own words..

Quote:
Quote:Yeah, sure. I mean, but basically, we have to bring our jobs back. I mean, the real plan is we have to negotiate trade deals that are good deals, not bad deals. And we're gonna renegotiate these horrible trade deals that have been made by people that don't know what they're doing. ... And we're going to bring our jobs back. I mean, you look at the African American community, there are no jobs—there's nothing you can do—there are no jobs. And we're gonna bring our jobs back from Mexico and from lots of other places that have taken them. And we're gonna get people that have, not only jobs, but really good paying jobs.

So how will Trump bring jobs? By bringing jobs! Now why didn't anybody else think of that?
Donald Trump and the Plan of No Plan
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#7
Yea, the perfect candidate for the working-class..

Quote:Union members are calling on the public to boycott Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's businesses nationwide because he isn't negotiating a contract with the more than 500 eligible workers at his high-rise Las Vegas hotel. UNITE HERE announced the effort this week. The group is the parent organization of the Culinary Union, which represents about 57,000 Las Vegas-area hospitality workers. "After a disgraceful anti-union campaign against their own workers, the hotel still refuses to negotiate with their employees," Geoconda Arguello-Kline, the top officer at the Culinary Union, said in a statement. "We call on allies and workers to stand in solidarity in a national boycott until Donald Trump, the 'Great Negotiator,' comes to the table." Workers at Trump's hotel voted in December to unionize, but management hasn't started bargaining with them. Experts say it could take years, and court action, before management is forced to come to the table.
Union launches boycott of Trump companies amid Vegas dispute | U.S. News | US News
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#8
Trump for the working class!!

Hahaha, follow the money. It could very well be that Trump has hardly paid any Federal taxes for nearly two decades.. The working class is paying much more taxes than Trump whilst having a tiny fraction of his lifestyle..

How are they going to expect that Trump will improve their plight? Will Trump change the tax system in favor of the working and middle classes? 

That is like asking if turkeys will vote for Christmas..

Trump (and Romney, etc.) IS the elite. They are massively benefiting from the system, they're not going to change it!

And this becomes blatantly obvious if we look at Trump's tax proposals. These will:
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#9
It's even worse:

Here is what Trump said about Obama:

Quote:On July 18, 2011, Trump appeared on Fox News and was asked about President Barack Obama's comments that well-to-do Americans should make a sacrifice for the country by paying more in taxes. He replied:


Quote:Well, I don’t mind sacrificing for the country to be honest with you. But you know, you do have a problem because half of the people don't pay any tax. And when he's talking about that he's talking about people that aren't also working, that are not contributing to this society. And it's a problem. But we have 50 percent. It just hit the 50 percent mark. Fifty percent of the people are paying no tax.
Watch Donald Trump Lecture Americans For Not Paying Taxes | Mother Jones

There is much more in that article, with Trump slamming poor working Americans for not paying Federal taxes, even rooting for Romney not to take back his 47% remark. 

At the minimum, that makes him a hypocrite...
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#10
Quote:Chris Christie, the New Jersey governor and head of Trump's presidential transition team, said that Trump's records showed that the U.S. tax code was an "absolute mess" and that Trump was the best person to fix it. "There's no one who has shown more genius in their way to maneuver about the tax code as he rightfully used the laws to do that," Christie said on "Fox News Sunday."

But Clinton spokesman Brian Fallon said the tax write-off declared by Trump "shows the colossal scale of his business failures" and also shows that the wealthy real estate developer operates under a different set of rules than those that apply to ordinary taxpayers.
Trump advisers say tax returns show 'genius' - Business Insider

So it's genius when Trump manages to mismanage companies so that they produce almost a billion loss in a single year, which he then uses to avoid future tax liabilities.

But it's ok for him to slander people who are too poor to pay Federal taxes as deadweight and deadbeats? 

And this is the guy that is supposedly anti-elite and will change the system in favor of the average Joe??

You have to be crazy to believe that..
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